How A Water Level Switch Works

A water lever control switch is just as the name implies, it controls how much water enters the washing machine. If the water level control switch is defective, or more commonly, if the small hose attached to the air bell comes off, there will no longer be pressure in the hose pushing on the air tight diaphragm in the water level control switch. The switch will not be able to open the electrical contacts to the washer fill valve and the washer will not stop filling. Water will run over the top, onto the floor, and on and on. The very first thing you should look for if you have a washing machine that is flooding, or overfilling, is whether or not the small tubing has come off the top of the air bell.

Sometimes when a washing machine vibrates with an unbalanced load, there is sufficient movement to pull the tube off the top of the air bell. If you find that you have this condition, make sure that you use a good adhesive, to secure the tubing to the air bell. Just be careful that you do not get any adhesive in the tube. If you find that you have a defective water level control switch, it’s probably wise to replace the tubing also.

If the tubing has not come off the air bell, and the water level control switch is not defective, the possibility exists that you have a defective washer fill valve. A washer fill valve uses an electromagnetic coil, to lift up a plunger that opens a gate to allow water to enter the machine. If debris in the fill valve prevents the gate from closing all the way, the water will continue to flow in the washer even if it is disconnected from the electrical supply.

In summary, if you have a washing machine that is flooding or overfilling, check the water level control switch, the tubing attached to it, or the water fill valve.